~ Herbal Rose-Hip Remedy Ameliorates Painful Arthritis Symptoms

~ Herbal Rose-Hip Remedy Ameliorates Painful Arthritis Symptoms
NewsRx.com, 10-20-05

An herbal remedy made from rose hips significantly ameliorates osteoarthritis pain.

In a recent clinical study, rheumatologists in Denmark sought "to determine whether a herbal remedy made from a subspecies of rose-hip (Rosa canina) might reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis and consumption of rescue medication in patients suffering from osteoarthritis."

"Ninety-four patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial," explained K. Winther and coauthors working at Copenhagen County Hospital Gentofte. "Forty-seven patients were given 5 g of the herbal remedy daily for a period of 3 months and the remaining patients were given a similar amount of placebo."

"The group initially treated with placebo was then changed to rose-hip and vice versa for another 3-month period," the investigators said. "Upon inclusion and after 3 weeks and 3 months of each treatment period, pain, stiffness, disability, and global severity of the disease were scored on a Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) questionnaire."

"After 3 weeks of treatment, patients, if possible, were allowed to reduce their consumption of 'rescue medication'," according to the report. "Data were analyzed on the basis of intention to treat."

Rose-hip therapy "resulted in a significant reduction in WOMAC pain (p<0.014) as compared to placebo, when testing after 3 weeks of treatment," clinical data showed. "The consumption of 'rescue medication' significantly declined as a result of active treatment (p<0.027)."

"WOMAC disability, stiffness, and global assessment of severity of the disease were not altered by 3 weeks but decreased significantly (p<0.018, p<0.038, and p<0.035, respectively) after 3 months of treatment," test results indicated.

"The data suggest that the present herbal remedy can alleviate symptoms of osteoarthritis and reduce the consumption of 'rescue medication'," the researchers concluded.

Winther and colleagues published their study in the Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology (A powder made from seeds and shells of a rose-hip subspecies (Rosa canina) reduces symptoms of knee and hip osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Scand J Rheumatol, 2005;34(4):302-308).

For additional information, contact K. Winther, Copenhagen County Hospital Gentofte, Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry, DK-2900 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Publisher contact information for the Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology is: Taylor & Francis AS, PO Box 12 Posthuset, NO-0051 Oslo, Norway.

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